Bellringers

If you live in England, whether in a large city or a small village, you have probably heard the sound of church bells. Bells have formed part of life in this country since the Middle Ages.

Church bells are the biggest and loudest musical instruments in the world. Their sound can be heard miles away from their towers.

Bells are rung to call people to church, to celebrate happy occasions and commemorate important events. They are also rung simply for the enjoyment of hearing their sound. Most church towers have bells. A set of bells is called a ‘ring’ or a ‘peal’. Village churches may have a small ring of bells, comprising six or eight bells. Bigger churches and cathedrals usually have a larger ring.

Bellringing is: 

• A unique hobby for whole families from 11 – 100

• Very sociable group participation – you’ll make friends for life

• Service to the Church

• Lots of brainwork if you like it – but this is optional!

• Healthy light exercise – you don’t need to be big and strong

• Helps to maintain a very English tradition

• It helps if you have a sense of rhythm and reasonable co-ordination – you don’t have to be a musician

 

We have six bells weighing 5cwt-12cwt and we ring in an upstairs ringing chamber, up a spiral staircase of 44 steps which is located on the north-east corner of the building. 

Our ringers are of varied ages (teenage to 70+) & ringing experience (ranging from learners to 40+ years of ringing). We welcome visitors and new ringers, and are able to give 1-1 instruction to anyone who is keen to learn. We practise on Thursday evenings, 7.30pm-9pm and ring for Sunday services 9.15am-10am. Four of our current ringers learned especially to be able to ring for the coronation in May 2023.

We also ring for weddings, funerals and other special events upon request - for example, in the past, we have offered (and rung) 3 quarter peals which were each one of the lots on offer at the church's 'Auction of Promises'. We have an annual tower outing somewhere in the locality, enjoying visiting new towers and spending social time together.

A few years ago we won the Stroud Branch striking competition and went on to represent the Branch at the G&B Diocesan competition.  We have close links with the local (Stroud) branch and ring with others when opportunities arise. During the Covid Lockdowns, many of our band used 'Ringingroom' to further our expertise in method ringing.

 

 

 

Angie Ayling is our Tower Captain while Tony Natt is the Ringing Master who takes the lead at practices and service ringing. Email Angie here